About your Search

20130101
20130131
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10
, then alys cohen, staff attorney for the national consumer law center. and then if i move all the way to my right-hand side, susan walker, who's professor -- susan wanter in from the university of pennsylvania, david moskowitz and karen thomas, senior executive vice president for government relations at the independent community bankers association of america. thank you all for being here, and perhaps we might start with you, mr. calhoun. >> thank you. today the cfpb announces one of its most important rules, the qualified mortgage ability to repay rule, along with the upcoming mortgage servicing rules that will come out next week that address failures in the mortgage market that devastated millions of families and our overall economy. the twin drivers of this were widespread, unaffordable loans and a broken mortgage servicing system that severely aggravated the ensuing wave of foreclosures. the goal of the dodd-frank legislation and the rule today are to redirect incentives so that lenders are encouraged to make loans that are long-term sustainable, not just generators of short-term fees.
tv after words with guest host authors and play right janet langhart cohen. this week is dorian clayborne carson and "martin's dream" my journey and the legacy of martin luther king, jr.. in it he recalls his journey from teenage civil rights activist to his presence at the 1963 march on -- he includes encounters with the many leaders and organizers in the civil rights movement including stokely carmichael and the king family. it's about an hour. >> host: dr. carson thanks for joining me on after words. >> guest: it's my pleasure. >> host: your book, "martin's dream" is a memoir and a history book. in the book you talk about your personal journey and you are very candid about your life and you also cover new insights as a historian to the life and legacy of dr. martin luther king jr.. what prompted you to write the book this way? >> guest: well, i wanted to write about the martin luther king anniversary and 50 years of my life that came to light and his legacy and life coincides with my coming-of-age. so part of it was to move those two tasks. i felt my life have been connected to the kin
. for the record redoing third event is coming near. >> and also eliot cohen is in raise the intellectual godfather of this book. his book says syrian command. his book supreme command is the best single thing ever written on how president should talk to the military. >> fantastic. autonomy said that. >> inÉs said. [laughter] >> my question coming out of the strategicprogram is two pronged mlb on this i have your book yet, so i hope you have a nerdy answer this. but the very well-publicized job done in afghanistan appeared to asia, what gives you hope when it comes to future generalship and what makes you despair? >> second part is easier to answer. a lot of things make me despair. what gives me hope that it's going to some perverse, but it's not. the defense budget is going to be cut and let us cut as the british famously said we have no money anymore, so now we must need. we have a military that is at a fire hose of money turned on the last 10 years and intelligence community community as well. they were basically given money and told her to spend it through the we have a generation of officers
, vice president of the national fair housing alliance. then alys cohen, staff attorney for the national consumer law center. and then if i move all the way to my right inside, susan wachter who is a professor for state and finance at wharton school at the university of pennsylvania. david moskowitz is deputy general counsel at wells fargo, and karen thomas, senior executive vice president of government relations at the independent community bankers association of america. thank you all for being here. and perhaps we might start with you, mr. calhoun. >> thank you. today, the cfpb announces one of its most important rules, a qualified mortgage ability-to-repay rule, along with the upcoming mortgage servicing rules that will come out next week, address failures in the mortgage market, the devastated -- a devastating millions of families and our overall economic. twin drivers of this were widespread, unaffordable loans, and a broken mortgage servicing system that severely aggravated the ensuing wave of foreclosures. the goal of the dodd-frank legislation, the rule today, our to redirect in
, senator cohen's column i call it from delaware will be interested in hearing from him about this issue as well. >> thank you, senator rubio. in the last congress more than three bills we cosponsored were focused on how to create jobs and drive our economy forward. senator hatch, i'm grateful for your leadership and senator klobuchar us who serve together on the judiciary committee and the four of us introduced today the spill of which we are so proud the immigration innovation act of 2013. mr. president, for decades the united peace and joy to commanding advantage being home to all the world's top universities, particularly science and knowledge you come engineering and math in the so-called stem fields and we were the best place for the graduates of those universities and art than science programs to stay homogeny business. but today, that field has changed in our competitors are vying to more supportive environment for innovators, conventions and started companies. there's been a change in the field of opportunity back home for those foreign nationals who in increasing numbers are ed
cohen, i think there are others who sort of say we've seen the end of growth. no more innovation, no more growth, we've now just got to settle down and deal with the fact that we're not going to have anymore growth. and i think the evidence is really strongly against that. there is in your pack and i'm doing a little bit of a plug here, james is a senior, external senior fellow here at brookings as well as director at the mckinsey global institute, and he and i are working on a project with the support of others looking at this question what are some of the game changers, what are the ways in which we can get innovation and, actually, as we get out of this mess on the deficit and the recession really start to get stronger growth in the economy. and the thing that's really needed, the thing that we didn't have in the first, even the first seven years of this century was sort of innovation-driven, output-driven growth. we had a lot of restructuring productivity but we haven't really had for some years now real output-driven innovation and growth, and that's part of what we're looki
husband. in 1996 i recall senator bill cohen approaching me, along with senator mccain, to help sponsor a burma sanctions bill. sanctions were put in place in 1997 and only loosened in july of this year. senator mcconnell later became one of aung san suu kyi's chief advocates in the senate, and we continue to work on behalf of the people of burma. in 2003 following an assassination attempt, senator mcconnell and i worked to pass an important ban that remains in place today. an effort to bring about further reform. and i must say burma is extremely lucky to have a champion like aung san suu kyi. in the face of violence, intimidation, harassment, she has never wavered from her principles or ceased her push for democracy and human rights. she celebrates the release of political prisoners, including approximately 90 released this week. but she remains true to those who remain behind bars, a number estimated to be around 200. this woman sacrificed many years of her life to bring about these changes. she is truly an inspiration to the world. you are so well deserving of this congressional gol
-sector organizations and services of public policy for 16 years. peter will be followed by joshua cohen, government affairs for tax reform. he looks a mistake on the immigration position. josh is responsible for federal immigration advocacy and state budget and tax issues. he appears to have a state government affairs at the national taxpayer union and before that served as legislative assistant to alexander g environment and agricultural civil justice task force. finally, we'll hear from ray hunt salon on politics of immigration reform. he is a nonfiction writer and analyst and policy advisor for economics 21, contributing editor at national review and columnist for writers opinion in a cnn contributor. after each panel sp, we'll take questions from the audience. but for microphone before you ask your question as it is wise to do with i.q. to be up. finally, please save any protest statements in the form of a question. thanks, we'll turn it to alex. >> thank you, lori. it's a pleasure to be here tonight. this is the earliest i've been out of the office and weeks. what should a supporter of free ma
, tyler cohen, i think there are others -- who sort of say we've seen the end of growth. no more growth. we've now just got to sort of settle down and deal with the fact that we're not going to have anymore growth. and i think the evidence is really strongly against that. there is in your pack, and i'm doing a little bit of a plug here, an external senior fellow here at brookings as well as director of the mckinsey global institute, and he and i are working on a project with the support of others looking at in this question what are some of the game changers, what are the ways in which we can get innovation and actually as we get out of this mess on the deficit and the recession really start to get stronger growth in the economy? and the thing that's really needed, the thing that we didn't have in the first, even the first seven years of this century was sort of innovation-driven, output-driven growth. we had a lot of restructuring productivity, but we haven't really had it for some years now real output-driven innovation and growth, and that's part of what we're looking for and part of
. also helping to shape where we went and what we did and his lead. i would defer with senator cohen's only in one word. that is that this crisis is unfolding not slowly. it is accelerating and exploding. there are now 650,000 refugees or more. 60,000 dead. those numbers are increasing exponentially in the night that we visited the day -- the night of the data we visited, there were between two and 3,000 refugees across the border as opposed to the average thousand the night before. so this problem far from going away or diminishing is actually exploding and increasing. destabilizing the entire region in turkey and jordan by imposing enhanced demands on their resources which the united states has had a historic obligation and opportunity. >> the children do farmed with dog seek aid ) said want to care for them. these features have been disrupted and changed forever by this war. relatives have been tortured and killed. may not comprehended right now, but their future will be transformed, and our future will be transformed. their future is in distinguishable from lars because. [indisce
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)